Anonymous asked:

It's alright, I'm just personally a supporter of the group. Not like, the crazy ones, but I just think that women should be free to do whatever they want with their bodies, minds, hearts, and lives. Same for men too really, but it seems like women get much more shit from it.

walressia answered:

I have to disagree with you anon, I believe men have it just as bad as women in a social view, men’s bodies are constantly shamed, set at impossible standards and objectified. The only difference is that women’s problems are put into the open and discussed constantly while men’s problems are pushed under the rug and forgotten about, but that’s just from personal experience and some of my friends experiences. But from a legal stand point men have it much worse, one of the most prominent ones is bodily autonomy, which is the right to make decisions about your own body, which woman have but men don’t. Also because of things like the Duluth model and the primary aggressor act, men are suffering in cases of domestic abuse and rape. That’s not even to mention the way civil courts far favor women in cases of custody than men

arguing-about-abortions:

walressia:

Alright if male issues aren’t as bad as female issues than how to you explain the fact that male suicide rates are nearly 4x as great as female suicide? Or how about the fact that men are falling behind in education with only 40% of all college graduates being men and 60% being female? Or how bout the only source that was “feminist” even me mentioning had a, let’s see what the perfect sjw buzz word for this… Victim blamey over tone, or what about the fact that 40% of all domestic abuse is directed at men and let me add ignored to that? 

And you know what’s funny feminists ignore this facts cause it’s not happening to females, it’s almost as if feminism doesn’t care about issues that happen to any other group unless it furthers their own goals
Here’s some sources for you friend:

http://www.suicide.org/suicide-statistics.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981112075159.htm
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/41928806/ns/business-us_business/t/men-falling-behind-women/
http://www.npr.org/2013/02/12/171806323/boys-are-at-the-back-of-the-class
http://www.womenshealth.gov/mens-health/violence-prevention-for-men/
http://domesticviolencestatistics.org/men-the-overlooked-victims-of-domestic-violence/

Women attempt suicide 3x more than men do. Men are more likely to complete suicide because they are socialized to strive for masculinity. Which means normalizing violence, not showing “weak and feminine emotions”, and to not seek help from others. This is largely and aggressively perpetuated by men, noted by the negative and sometimes violent reactions that men receive from other men when doing things that go against masculinity, such as practicing femininity or crying. The statistic also forgets 3-5% of these suicides are actually murder-suicides. Women are overwhelmingly (>90%) the murder victim in murder-suicides. [X][X][X]

As far as domestic violence, I’m going to copy and paste this, by Plansfornigel: 

"…the most recent report by the US Department of Justice, which found women suffer 805,700 physical injuries at the hands of partners each year, compared to 173,960 men. Moreover, the injuries suffered by women were more than twice as likely to be considered “serious”, defined as including sexual violence, gunshot and knife wounds, internal injuries, unconsciousness, and broken bones. To put that another way, partners inflicted 104,741 serious injuries on women, compared with less than 9,400 inflicted on men, a greater than 11:1 ratio. [14] Even those men who have been subject to partner violence have usually not taken it seriously. According to a study by researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin, they were “significantly more likely than were women to laugh at partner-initiated violence”, while women “reported more fear, anger, and insult and less amusement when their partners were violent.” [21] It’s also worth noting that a number of these male injuries were incurred by male rather than female partners; according to a 2000 Department of Justice report, men living with male partners are at nearly twice the risk of “serious” violence as those living with women. [22] If women really are criminally prosecuted in 6% of domestic violence cases, then that figure sounds eminently reasonable.” 

I’m not so sure what’s wrong with 40% of college graduates being men? That’s almost half. I mean, in one claim you argued “40% of domestic violence victims are men” with the implication of it being a significant number. Now 40% is far to few? Not to mention that women have long been barred from higher education, even to this day in some countries. Women in some countries have experienced violence for trying to receive an education. Malala Yousafzai was a victim of attempted murder for her activism in rights to education for women. Certainly not “just as bad as women”. 

Again, I’m not fucking saying men don’t have issues or they don’t matter. I’m saying they aren’t “just as bad as women’s”. They don’t have to be equally bad for them to be important. I still don’t know why you want men to be so oppressed. If you actually care about men’s issues, you should be thrilled men don’t have it as bad as women do. 

rincewindsapprentice:

Some people love to shut down people who talk about trans and intersex issues by saying that they’re “only 1% of the population” and thus can be ignored since they “aren’t statistically significant enough.”

By that logic, we can now systematically ignore:

  • Redheads
  • The entire state of Rhode Island
  • Anyone who makes over $500,000 a year
  • Pacific Islanders
  • Australia
america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 
Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.
Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.
But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?
Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.
While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.
We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.
This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 

Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.

Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.

But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?

Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.

While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.

We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.

This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 

(Read Full Text)

Reblogged from marinalikesbutts

When I was a girl, I was terribly sure trees and flowers were the same as birds or people. That they thought things, and talked among themselves. And we could hear them if we really tried. It was just a matter of emptying your head of all other sounds. Being very quiet and listening very hard. Sometimes I still believe that. But one can never get quiet enough.
Truman Capote, In Cold Blood  (via lovequotesrus)